Skip to main content

Table 1 Survey questions

From: Perioperative temperature monitoring in general and neuraxial anesthesia: a survey study

 Part 1: General approaches (*mark only one oval)
Q1:What is your professional position?
 Research assistant, specialist doctor, academic staff
Q2:How long is your experience in anesthesiology?
 1–5 years, 5–8 years, 8–12 years, 12 years and more
Q3:What kind of institute are you working on?
 University hospital, public hospital, training and research hospital, private hospital/clinic
Q4:Do you apply body temperature monitoring to each patient?
 I practice routinely, I never practice, I rarely do, According to the patient group (child, elderly, cardiac, etc.).
Q5:Do you think that patients who do not apply body temperature monitoring leave the operation room as normothermic?
 Yes, no, most of the time, sometimes
Q6:What are the patient groups that certainly you do body temperature monitoring?
 Pediatric patient group, geriatric patient group, cardiovascular surgery, major general surgical operations, all surgeries for more than 30 min.
Q7:Where do you prefer to monitor the core temperature under general anesthesia?
 Tympanic membrane, rectal, nasopharynx, pulmonary artery catheter, bladder, others
Q8:Do you measure the temperature of your patients preoperatively?
 Yes, no, sometimes
Q9:What would you use as the heating method in the preoperative waiting room? Check all that apply.
 Cotton blanket, socks, hot air blowing systems, radiant heaters, others
Q10:Which of the heating methods do you use during the operation?
 Cotton blanket, socks, hot air blowing systems, radiant heaters, IV fluid and blood product heaters, heat dehumidifier filters, hot water bag, I use them all
Q11:What do you use as a heating method in the recovery room? (*check all that apply)
 Cotton blanket, socks, hot air blowing systems, radiant heaters, IV fluid and blood product heaters, heat dehumidifier filters, hot water bag, I use them all
 Part 2: Approaches in neuraxial anesthesia
Q12:Do you think that heat monitorization is necessary during neuraxial anesthesia?
 Yes, no, sometimes
Q13:Do you perform temperature monitorization during neuraxial anesthesia? (*check all that apply)
 I always practice routinely, I never practice, I rarely do, according to the patient group (child, elderly, cardiac, etc.)
Q14:Which area do you use for the temperature monitoring in the awake patient or under neuraxial anesthesia? (*check all that apply)
 Any skin temperature, temperature of the chest front wall, atemperature, distal temperatures in the lower extremity, fingertips, forehead area, others
Q15:What are the reasons why you do not follow body temperature for each patient?
 Lack of equipment and materials, I consider it a waste of time, I think it is not necessary for any patient, I think the application is not necessary except for the critical patients, others
Q16:Do you observe hypothermia in patients with neuraxial anesthesia? (mark only one oval)
 Yes, no
 Part 3: Attitudes related to measurement techniques
Q17:Do you think that temperature monitoring is within standard monitoring? (*mark only one oval)
 Yes, no
Q18:How often do you experience perioperative hypothermia-related complications? (*mark only one oval)
 In long-term operations, rarely, with elderly, pediatric patient groups
Q19:How much do you adhere to the recommendations of national and international guidelines on preventing perioperative hypothermia in your operating room? (Europe; NİCE 2008, America; ASA 2015 and Turkey; TSAR 2013)
 Sometimes, never, always
\